Disturbo del comportamento suicidario: che cos'è?

Recensito il 7 gennaio 2021

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Sommario

Suicidal behavior disorder can be treated, just like any physical or mental health disorder.

We used to think of suicide as the result of depression. Or maybe due to a bad life event. While it can be, doctors now look at it in a new way. Thoughts or attempts at taking one’s own life might be a preventable condition on its own. The proposed diagnosis is called suicidal behavior disorder.

Understanding suicidal behavior disorder

La Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (a guide used by doctors) describes it as:

  • A person making a try within the last two years
  • The act taken couldn’t be described as self-injury or to feel better
  • There was no prep or thoughts before
  • It was not done in a state of confusion
  • It was not done for a religious or political goal

Studies show that 25 percent to 30 percent of people who try to take their life will try again within two years. Still, more than three times as many will not. Learning more might help you save a loved one.

Those at risk

Suicide attempts can happen at any stage in life, but usually not in kids younger than 5. People from many cultures and economic levels try to take their own lives. Suicidal behavior disorder acts like other depressive issues in that it’s different for all.

A major worry is that a try can cause life-threatening issues, or new ones that need to be medically handled. Take all talk of suicide seriously. Look for these signs:

  • Mentioning the wish to die and a plan
  • Losing interest in things a person used to like
  • Sentirsi un peso per gli altri
  • Cambiamenti nel mangiare, nel dormire o nella quantità di alcol/uso di droghe
  • Regalare cose care
  • Estremi sbalzi d'umore
  • Storia familiare di suicidio

While there are often red flags, sometimes a person who wants to take her own life shows no signs at all.

How to help someone

If a friend or loved one wants to talk about ending his life, listen. Let him talk without judgment from you. Keep in mind:

  • If there is danger right now, call 911.
  • Let him know you care and that there is help.
  • Stay calm and make sure you are both safe.
  • Try not to overreact or get angry.
  • It’s OK to ask: “Are you thinking about ending your life?”
  • Send or call for help, together.

If she seems open to taking the next steps to get help, offer to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline with her: (800) 273-TALK (8255). Or go with her to talk with a friend, coach, pastor, or trusted family member.

If the threat is made from a text or online, call him. If a threat is made over the phone, ask him where he is. Ask if someone else is there. Keep him on the line until you can get help.

The good news is that doctors might be able to find out if someone has suicidal behavior disorder by asking a series of questions. The answers to those questions can suggest whether someone is at risk. Suicidal behavior disorder can likely be treated, just like any other health issue. Knowing the issue will get the needed care more quickly.

There is hope for recovery. There is also hope for being part of the great number of people with suicidal thoughts who stay alive.

Di Andrea Rizzo, MAE
Source: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5); Changing the Conversation from Suicide to Suicide Prevention ヨ A United National Campaign, http://suicidepreventionmessaging.actionallianceforsuicideprevention.org/; National Institute of Mental Health, Suicide Prevention, www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention/index.shtml#part_153176; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Increase in Suicide in the United States, 1999-2014," www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db241.htm; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Preventing Suicide," www.cdc.gov/Features/PreventingSuicide/index.html

Sommario

Suicidal behavior disorder can be treated, just like any physical or mental health disorder.

We used to think of suicide as the result of depression. Or maybe due to a bad life event. While it can be, doctors now look at it in a new way. Thoughts or attempts at taking one’s own life might be a preventable condition on its own. The proposed diagnosis is called suicidal behavior disorder.

Understanding suicidal behavior disorder

La Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (a guide used by doctors) describes it as:

  • A person making a try within the last two years
  • The act taken couldn’t be described as self-injury or to feel better
  • There was no prep or thoughts before
  • It was not done in a state of confusion
  • It was not done for a religious or political goal

Studies show that 25 percent to 30 percent of people who try to take their life will try again within two years. Still, more than three times as many will not. Learning more might help you save a loved one.

Those at risk

Suicide attempts can happen at any stage in life, but usually not in kids younger than 5. People from many cultures and economic levels try to take their own lives. Suicidal behavior disorder acts like other depressive issues in that it’s different for all.

A major worry is that a try can cause life-threatening issues, or new ones that need to be medically handled. Take all talk of suicide seriously. Look for these signs:

  • Mentioning the wish to die and a plan
  • Losing interest in things a person used to like
  • Sentirsi un peso per gli altri
  • Cambiamenti nel mangiare, nel dormire o nella quantità di alcol/uso di droghe
  • Regalare cose care
  • Estremi sbalzi d'umore
  • Storia familiare di suicidio

While there are often red flags, sometimes a person who wants to take her own life shows no signs at all.

How to help someone

If a friend or loved one wants to talk about ending his life, listen. Let him talk without judgment from you. Keep in mind:

  • If there is danger right now, call 911.
  • Let him know you care and that there is help.
  • Stay calm and make sure you are both safe.
  • Try not to overreact or get angry.
  • It’s OK to ask: “Are you thinking about ending your life?”
  • Send or call for help, together.

If she seems open to taking the next steps to get help, offer to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline with her: (800) 273-TALK (8255). Or go with her to talk with a friend, coach, pastor, or trusted family member.

If the threat is made from a text or online, call him. If a threat is made over the phone, ask him where he is. Ask if someone else is there. Keep him on the line until you can get help.

The good news is that doctors might be able to find out if someone has suicidal behavior disorder by asking a series of questions. The answers to those questions can suggest whether someone is at risk. Suicidal behavior disorder can likely be treated, just like any other health issue. Knowing the issue will get the needed care more quickly.

There is hope for recovery. There is also hope for being part of the great number of people with suicidal thoughts who stay alive.

Di Andrea Rizzo, MAE
Source: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5); Changing the Conversation from Suicide to Suicide Prevention ヨ A United National Campaign, http://suicidepreventionmessaging.actionallianceforsuicideprevention.org/; National Institute of Mental Health, Suicide Prevention, www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention/index.shtml#part_153176; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Increase in Suicide in the United States, 1999-2014," www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db241.htm; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Preventing Suicide," www.cdc.gov/Features/PreventingSuicide/index.html

Sommario

Suicidal behavior disorder can be treated, just like any physical or mental health disorder.

We used to think of suicide as the result of depression. Or maybe due to a bad life event. While it can be, doctors now look at it in a new way. Thoughts or attempts at taking one’s own life might be a preventable condition on its own. The proposed diagnosis is called suicidal behavior disorder.

Understanding suicidal behavior disorder

La Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (a guide used by doctors) describes it as:

  • A person making a try within the last two years
  • The act taken couldn’t be described as self-injury or to feel better
  • There was no prep or thoughts before
  • It was not done in a state of confusion
  • It was not done for a religious or political goal

Studies show that 25 percent to 30 percent of people who try to take their life will try again within two years. Still, more than three times as many will not. Learning more might help you save a loved one.

Those at risk

Suicide attempts can happen at any stage in life, but usually not in kids younger than 5. People from many cultures and economic levels try to take their own lives. Suicidal behavior disorder acts like other depressive issues in that it’s different for all.

A major worry is that a try can cause life-threatening issues, or new ones that need to be medically handled. Take all talk of suicide seriously. Look for these signs:

  • Mentioning the wish to die and a plan
  • Losing interest in things a person used to like
  • Sentirsi un peso per gli altri
  • Cambiamenti nel mangiare, nel dormire o nella quantità di alcol/uso di droghe
  • Regalare cose care
  • Estremi sbalzi d'umore
  • Storia familiare di suicidio

While there are often red flags, sometimes a person who wants to take her own life shows no signs at all.

How to help someone

If a friend or loved one wants to talk about ending his life, listen. Let him talk without judgment from you. Keep in mind:

  • If there is danger right now, call 911.
  • Let him know you care and that there is help.
  • Stay calm and make sure you are both safe.
  • Try not to overreact or get angry.
  • It’s OK to ask: “Are you thinking about ending your life?”
  • Send or call for help, together.

If she seems open to taking the next steps to get help, offer to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline with her: (800) 273-TALK (8255). Or go with her to talk with a friend, coach, pastor, or trusted family member.

If the threat is made from a text or online, call him. If a threat is made over the phone, ask him where he is. Ask if someone else is there. Keep him on the line until you can get help.

The good news is that doctors might be able to find out if someone has suicidal behavior disorder by asking a series of questions. The answers to those questions can suggest whether someone is at risk. Suicidal behavior disorder can likely be treated, just like any other health issue. Knowing the issue will get the needed care more quickly.

There is hope for recovery. There is also hope for being part of the great number of people with suicidal thoughts who stay alive.

Di Andrea Rizzo, MAE
Source: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5); Changing the Conversation from Suicide to Suicide Prevention ヨ A United National Campaign, http://suicidepreventionmessaging.actionallianceforsuicideprevention.org/; National Institute of Mental Health, Suicide Prevention, www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention/index.shtml#part_153176; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Increase in Suicide in the United States, 1999-2014," www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db241.htm; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Preventing Suicide," www.cdc.gov/Features/PreventingSuicide/index.html

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